Benefits of robo advice

Benefits of Robo Advice according to ESMA

Robo advice has had a major impact on the wealth management industry. Several wealth managers have already started a robo advice alternative; others are or have a choice in development reviewing strategic options.
Measures for Wealth Managers
Wealth management companies assessing their choices associated with robo advice should assess five essential factors:
1. Alternatives will be developed in house,through a venture, or via theacquisition of a current supplier.
2 The robo advice will be placed—as a standalone offering, within a full service financial advisory program a hybrid vehicle of both.
3 Whether the company has the analytics customers and to get the tips and insights to work efficiently with them.
4 How the product will provide an intuitive and satisfactory customer expertise. That is usually reached through an iterative procedure involving prototypes, client laboratories and high-speed revisions and improvements.
5. Internal and external advertising management plans undertaken
We consider the effects that are most significant on the business, nevertheless, will come from capacities which haven’t yet. Which, although been released to the marketplace are legitimate extensions of robo advice abilities. As well as cognitive these comprise the add-on of investments besides ETFs, eventually, alternate investments such as property and hedge funds. The increase of robo adice matches up with that being indicated by business trends. More cooperation is being sought by investors and integration with their advisers. Rather than just being told how their cash is how it’s and invested performing, robo advisory gives investors a manner to connect to their advisers, raising their participation.

Benefits to financial institutions

Benefits relating to cost
Financial institutions incur fewer costs to deliver financial advice
It may be cheaper for financial institutions to provide advice through automated tools, for example because automated advice does not require the employment of human advisers, or because fewer costs are incurred from potential human errors. Although a period of initial investment is required, once the cost of system development has been met, the marginal cost of each new transaction may be relatively low, enabling financial institutions to benefit from economies of scale.
Benefits relating to the size of the potential client base 
Financial institutions have access to a wider range of consumers if they provide advice through automated tools
By providing advice through automated tools financial institutions may have access to a wider range of consumers, not only due to the relative ease of attracting a potential clients from across the EU via an online presence, but also because they can attract new categories of consumers that prefer to use online channels as opposed to face-to-face or telephone channels. Financial institutions can thus benefit from automated tools to increase their distribution platform to deliver advice.
Benefits relating to the quality of service
Financial institutions use automated tools to deliver a consistent consumer experience
Automated tools may be seen by financial institutions as a way to deliver a more standardised consumer experience by removing the potential for differences due to human interpretation.
An automated tool may also enhance the quality of the service provided to consumers by providing a direct link with current market or other relevant data. Automated tools can more rapidly process large quantities of evolving data and consequently update the advice output on a real-time and ongoing basis, if needed.
The provision of advice by financial institutions is more easily auditable because automated tools are more easily interrogated
Automated processes that are documented ex ante, for example in the logic of an algorithm or decision tress, can be easily reviewed and monitored by financial institutions (e.g. by Compliance, Risk or Audit functions).  It may be also be easier on an ex post basis to interrogate decisions made by an automated  tool, which performs tasks in a highly consistent manner than decisions that have been made by a human being.
As automated tools can generate an automatic record of the information that has been captured, the decisions made, and the output provided, it may also be easier for financial institutions to maintain records of the advice process, and to provide such records, for example in the event of a consumer complaint.

Benefits to consumers

Benefits relating to cost
Consumers pay less when they receive advice through automated tools
Automation in financial advice could decrease the costs of providing advice, which might make advice more affordable to a wider range of consumers. Most automated advisers market their offering as a low cost alternative to human advice.
Benefits relating to consumer access
A wider range of consumers has access to advice through automated tools
Consumers that may not normally contact a human advisor to obtain financial advice (e.g. because they feel that they are not wealthy enough to consult a financial advisor, or that the advisor is not objective enough) might feel more confident using robo advice tools. Increasing automation may therefore democratise access to financial advice.
Some categories of users  do not have experience in consulting a human financial advisor (for example, younger consumers, or less affluent consumers where the cost of financial advice may not be worth the benefit of the advice provided). These consumers might feel that robo advisory tools, which can also offer financial advice at a lower cost and with limited investment of time, are more accessible than advice provided by a person. This might give some investors greater motivation to act upon financial matters that they would not if they were using a human adviser.
Consumers have access to a wider range of service providers using robo advice tools 
As automated financial advice tools are usually available online they more readily facilitate cross-border transactions, compared to human advice. This makes it easier for consumers to access a wider range of advice providers, including from other jurisdictions.
Consumers obtain financial advice in a faster, easier and non-time-consuming way
Because robo advisory services are available online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are aimed at reaching a wide range of consumers, consumers may feel that automated tools that provide advice are easier to use than a human adviser. For example, online automated tools may present information to users in a short and digestible way. It also usually takes only a few moments after an initial questionnaire is answered by the consumer before the advice is obtained as a result of the underlying algorithm.
Benefits relating to the quality of service
Consumers receive more consistent advice when they use automated tools 
A well-developed algorithm may be more consistently accurate than the human brain at complex repeatable regular processes, and in making predictions.  Robo advice tools could therefore reduce some elements of behavioural biases, human error or poor judgement that may exist when advice is provided by a human. A well-developed algorithm could ensure equal and similar advice to all investors with similar characteristics. This might improve the consistency of advice provided, regardless of the investors’ geographical residence or ability to identify and access a quality human adviser.
Robo advisory tools may also enable users to receive advice without feeling pressured or led as a result of personal relationships. Without the human interaction with an advisor, some consumers may feel they can take their decisions more freely and objectively.
Consumers obtain advice based on the most up-to-date market information when using an automated tool 
Because robo advisory software tools are able to rapidly process large volumes of complex data, it is possible for an automated tool to quickly assess and reassess the recommendations it makes against current data, on an ongoing basis. For example, robo advice tools can incorporate market changes continuously, to provide real-time, personalised feedback to consumers. Human advisors may find it more challenging to be as constantly up to date with relevant market developments.
Consumers find it easier to keep a record of the advisory process
The use of robo advice tools allows investors to easily receive and retain the details of their financial transactions online. For example, as robo software tools systematically record all the stages of the advisory process, they can easily provide a print out of the questions and answers which lead to the recommendation. This may help users in the future, for example if they have a query about the advice provided

Robo-advisers are systems that use algorithms to handle users’ investment platforms. And they may be threatening to upend the tremendous wealth management business that is international.

BI Intelligence predictions that robo-advisers will handle around 10% of overall worldwide assets under management (AUM) by 2020.

In a fresh report from BI Intelligence, we examine the marketplace for robo-advisory services, the motorists behind consumer adoption of robo- guiding the robo-adviser marketplace presents a chance to wealth management businesses that are conventional, and how startup robo-
As substantial legacy businesses start offering their own services counselors can triumph.

Big riches supervisors that are incumbent will not lose out to startups like Wealthfront and Betterment. Rather, they establishing their own products, which are scaling fast and are adopting the technology.
Consumers across all asset types are open to robo-advisers — such as the rich. 49% of the group would consider investing some of the assets using a robo advisor.
Many assets managed by robo advisers will come from those who have some investments.

Startups will have to identify their products to triumph, and are likely to find it hard to scale. They may be doing this by supplying riches managers with white label services, and more customized stand alone options.

Next steps for robo advice
We believe that robo-advice will, however, finally have an outsized impact on the wealth management business. The capabilities will, for instance, accelerate the process of fee compression which is already affecting the industry. The lower cost for robo-guidance services probably will put pressure. Wealth management companies must keep a close attention on methods to automate processes and transactions that are currently performed manually and on operating costs.
Robo advice may also give accessibility to a big new marketplace of millennials who are interested in amassing wealth, but have had only limited choices when it comes to investment management to wealth management firms. As these individuals develop and assemble assets (through their own efforts and through inheritance from their boomer parents and grandparents) they can represent an important growth opportunity for wealth management companies.
Ultimately, improvements in technology— particularly in cognitive computing and “smart machines” capable of complex reasoning and interaction with people — will transform the investing landscape in ways that are potentially disruptive. For wealth management firms, robo-guidance services can be a bet on the future — a method to get customers and financial advisors acclimated to working with machines that can enhance and expand human operation.
The time to think about this new FinTech wave, and prepare for it is now.
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